REVIEW: The Green Pajamas’ “Green Pajama Country!”

The Green Pajamas have been around for so long, it’s a shock that these guys do not already have a museum named in honor of them and their music. But these guys are taking the long road, knowing that honors and museums aren’t necessary when you simply want to play, and this time they’re doing it country style. Surprise? Maybe, maybe not.

Green Pajama Country (Green Monkey) is an album that goes through the different styles of country in the last 40 years, including various journeys that country has done by going in and out of rock and pop, and vice versa. The subject matter is very much what you might expect to hear blaring out of a honky tonk jukebox, drinking your misery as you try to caress anything that pulses. “She’s Gone, She’s Gone, She’s Gone, Daddy She’s Gone”, “Dark Water (In The Wires)”, and “Pass Me Another Whiskey” isn’t exactly music for country purists, in fact some of the craft put into the production may be favored by rock audiences who enjoy their favorite artists dabbling into country. Then again, prove me wrong, for the songwriting on this is the type that is part of the norm in… I was going to say country, but in truth any songwriting that takes time and care will come off sounding like this. You’ll hear “You Had A Way About You” and you’ll want to put down your beer, take the closest lad or lassie, and dance the blues a way.

Forgetting the country motif for a moment, the songs on Green Pajama Country!are quite good and should be songs that will be covered by countless bands for the next 25 years. Tom Pettytoad the wet sprocketNeil Young, and Ben Foldswould treat these songs with respect and make them feel as if they wrote it themselves. In this case, it was Jeff Kelly responsible for all but one of these songs, and with enough of a push, I could see country artists doing a tribute to this album in full. Don’t wait for the full glory of these songs, make an effort to buy this and allow it to scare your countrified-blues away, or feel good in knowing you’re not down in the optimistic gutter like some of these songs suggest.

 

John Book